By Mary Williams, Guest Writer

I would not be writing on the subject had we ceased conversation on it, but alas, society loves a good grudge … the stage is set: It was November and that means that before Thanksgiving had even occurred, Christmas decorations were up, Christmas music was playing and Christmas cups, were, well, enraging a surprisingly high number of American citizens.

Traditionally, Starbucks is known for having iconic, wintery, Christmas images displayed on all three sizes of its cardboard cups that hold hot beverages.  At this season’s ‘Christmas Cup’ unveiling, customers became enraged at the reveal of a crisp, red cup that portrayed just one image: the Starbucks logo.

According to what I have seen on television and my friends’ iPhone screens, Americans are claiming that the red cup is a “war on Christmas.”

Personally, while I religiously celebrate Christmas, I find the lack of imagery on the cup refreshing and appealing to all religions during the holiday season. As it does not target one specific religion as “correct” for the holiday season, it is usable by all.

We as a society tend to forget that during the Christmas season, other religions are also engaging in religious practices, such as Hanukkah, which is widely practiced in the United States. Yet I have never seen popular Hanukkah images appear on a Starbucks cup.

My point is this: we as a society have reached a “damned if we do, damned if we don’t” stalemate.

Had Starbucks put solely Christmas images on their cups, would people of other religions not have been upset? If Starbucks had put images that signify a different religion, such as Judaism, would Christmas lovers have not been in an uproar?  Why do Christmas lovers need a cup that they eventually throw in the garbage to solidify their Christmas spirit?

Christmas was, after all, built on religious values and ideals rather than the paper vessel for a Gingerbread Latte.

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