By early June, many RedHawks began to work, travel, or start the Summer Semester. Recent graduate Andrew Dusing kicked off his summer by heading out west. More specifically, out west to the Historic Hayward Field at the University of Oregon.

 

Dusing had serious business in Eugene, OR. He was set to race at the NCAA Division 1 Outdoor Track and Field Championship, against some of the NCAA’s finest runners in the 1500 meters.

 

It was most definitely a job well-done, as Andrew Dusing would run a time of three minutes and 44.56 seconds to secure a sixth place finish in the 1500 meters finals.

 

Dusing attained First-Team All-American status by bringing home three points for the Red and White, the first time since 2006 that a Miami male scored in the meet.

 

To make it into the finals, Dusing made a tremendous effort. Prior to NCAA’s, his personal best was three minutes and 45 seconds, more than seven seconds slower than fellow competitor Craig Engels from the University of Mississippi.

 

The 1500 meters has two preliminary heats prior to the final — the twelve fastest times will move on to the next round. Dusing ended up in the faster heat, which propelled him past the winners of the second heat.

 

Dusing held onto the pack and through his strong running, he was able to demolish his previous personal best by running a time of three minutes and 40 seconds.

 

This time made Miami track history as well, because Dusing’s time became the fastest time ever run by a RedHawk in the 1500. His time beat Roosevelt Jackson’s record from 1984 by 0.01 seconds.

 

The final turned to be more strategic —  runners would keep a slower pace until the end and then kick to the finish line.

 

Dusing said that through “preparation,” “experience,” and “adrenaline” he was able to execute to perfection. His time of three minutes and 44.56 seconds was slightly more than a half second from the winner, junior Josh Kerr of the University of New Mexico.

 

Dusing said that he owes this season’s success — he also set personal bests in the 5000 meters, 800 meters, and the mile — to his progression over four years at Miami, taking better care of his body, adapting new philosophies from new coaches, and most importantly having more self-confidence.

 

Dusing had one year left of cross country eligibility, but he decided to forego it as he had a job awaiting him in Cleveland.

 

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