The things we watched, listened to and streamed over Homecoming weekend

“REVIEW”

As The Student’s television critic, I understand that the job of a reviewer can be demanding. But my own stressful experiences pale in comparison to those of Forrest MacNeil, the fictional critic played by Andy Daly on “Review.” As Forrest explains in the show’s opening, he doesn’t review movies or books — he reviews life experiences. Whatever his viewers suggest, he will review. From developing an addiction to starting a cult, nothing is off limits (and nothing gets zero stars, so “Racism” earns half a star). The show is at its best when we see the consequences of Forrest’s no-holds-barred ideology. In one of the best episodes, he first pushes his digestive system to the limits by consuming 15 pancakes. He then has to divorce his wife, and after reaching a point of total emotional devastation, he is asked to review what it’s like to eat 30 pancakes. If anything else, “Review” makes me happy I only have to critique television. (Devon Shuman, Culture Editor)

“PARKS AND RECREATION”

After only the first episode of “Parks and Recreation,” I thought to myself, “Why did it take me so long to start watching this?” (Of course now I’m already into the fourth season.) I didn’t start “The Office” on time either, but since then I have watched all nine seasons at least twice. And while I still prefer the character chemistry and ever-funny jokes that only “Office” fans will understand, “Parks and Rec” is an amazing replacement. I relate to Leslie Knope, Ron Swanson, Tom Haverford and April Ludgate all at the same time — there’s at least one person for every fan.   (Alison Perelman, Assistant Culture Editor)

“DON’T THINK TWICE”

This bittersweet ensemble comedy follows the members of the Commune, an improv comedy troupe. The film’s funniest moments aren’t the bits the cast plays out on stage (though those will make you laugh, too). They’re the jokes that they make crammed in a minivan on their way back from a hospital or sitting around a coffee table in a cramped New York apartment. (Emily Williams, Managing Editor)

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