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How professors teach Climate Change

How do you teach Miami University students a politically-charged topic like climate change? Erase the smoke and mirrors, and show them the facts. That’s what Miami assistant professor Kevin Armitage and John Tchernev do in their classes. Step one: look at the research. “I was someone who had heard about climate change, I generally believed that it was probably true… it seemed like there was a lot of different types of information out there, and I wasn’t sure what to trust,” Tchernev said. While in graduate school at Ohio State University (OSU), Tchernev took a class that examined how the public learns about climate change and the public dialogue around it. Experts from other departments often came to talk with the class and answer questions. “It was a chance for me to read a lot of the scientific research on climate change, which when you read it, it’s really very clear…. it is happening, it’s already happening, the globe is warming and humans are behind a lot of it,” said Tchernev. “The only areas of uncertainty are how bad it’s going to be and exactly what’s the timeframe when these things are going to happen.” Where does the research come from? Tchernev turns to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) annual report – an over 4,700-page analysis of the scientific, technical and socio-economic information around climate change set...

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JANUS Forum rescheduled, new speaker announced

The steering committee of Miami University’s JANUS Forum will host two speakers who will discuss the mounting conflict between the #blacklivesmatter and #bluelivesmatter movements at 6 p.m. this Thursday in the Farmer School of Business’s Taylor Auditorium. The event was originally scheduled earlier this month and was set to feature political commentator Heather Mac Donald and documentary filmmaker Dawn Porter. However, due to illness, the event was postponed. In Porter’s place, former governor of Maryland and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Martin O’Malley will be speaking. The Black Lives Matter movement, is “a national organization working for the validity of black life,” and that actively works to “(re)build” the Black Liberation movement, according to their website. The Blue Lives Matter movement “[seeks] to honor and recognize the actions of law enforcement,”according to their website.  Additionally, they endeavor to “strengthen public support and provide much-needed resources” to those in law-enforcement and their families. This semester’s JANUS Forum will spark dialogue between two controversial figures. Heather Mac Donald has been outspoken on the Black Lives Matter movement since the riots in Ferguson, during which she described a “Ferguson effect.”  O’Malley, representing the Black Lives Matter side,  served as Maryland’s governor during the riots in Baltimore after the death of Freddie Gray in 2015. O’Malley was criticized for saying “All lives matter” in 2015, but he later apologized and has since came out in...

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How Miami’s drinking culture compares to other universities

Over the past months, Miami has gained a reputation for its drinking behaviors. Niche, a college ranking website, rated Miami as the number three party school in the country in 2017. This semester in particular, local media outlets and the university held a microscope over student drinking behaviors at Miami. A campus climate survey was released last month aiming to gauge how Miami students drink and think about alcohol, as well as other campus climate concerns. But pull back the microscope, and how does Miami stack up against other universities’ drinking behaviors? Among four-year public universities, Miami ranked within the top six percent nationally, according to the U.S. Department of Education’s Clery Report. The national average for four-year public universities was four violations per every 1000 students. The Clery Report publishes crime reports from all U.S. colleges, reports mandated by the federal Clery Act, also known as the Campus Security Act. These statistics came from the reported number of on-campus crimes and includes regional campuses as well as community colleges. Approximately one in 45 Miami students received a liquor violation in 2015. Miami’s rate for liquor violations doubled that of four-year public universities in Ohio last year: 22 and 11 violations per 1,000 students respectively, excluding regional campuses that reported zero violations. The national average for four-year public universities was 4.4 violations per 1,000 students. Among four-year public universities...

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How Miami’s drinking culture compares to other universities

Over the past months, Miami has gained a reputation for its college drinking behaviors. Niche, a college ranking website, rated Miami as the number three party school in the country in 2017. This semester in particular, local media outlets and the university held a microscope over student drinking behaviors at Miami. A campus climate survey was released last month aiming to gauge how Miami students drink and think about alcohol, as well as other campus climate concerns. But pull back the microscope, and how does Miami stack up against other universities’ drinking behaviors? Among four-year public universities, Miami ranked within the top six percent nationally, according to the U.S. Department of Education’s Clery Report. The national average for four-year public universities was four violations per every 1000 students. The Clery Report publishes crime reports from all U.S. colleges, reports mandated by the federal Clery Act, also known as the Campus Security Act. These statistics came from the reported number of on-campus crimes and include regional campuses as well as community colleges. Approximately one in 45 Miami students received a liquor violation in 2015. Miami’s rate for liquor violations doubled that of four-year public universities in Ohio last year: 22 and 11 violations per 1,000 students respectively, excluding regional campuses that reported zero violations. The national average for four-year public universities was 4.4 violations per 1,000 students. Among four-year public...

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